cinefobia
cinefobia
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We all go a little mad sometimes.

We all go a little mad sometimes.

We all go a little mad sometimes.

We all go a little mad sometimes.
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Martin Scorsese :  In Raging Bull, I guess the boxing scenes have a lot to do with the action sequences in my mind. All this editing and all this camera movement that I’d been exposed to for the past 25 years or 30 years came into play in those sequences, and Hitchcock had a lot to do with it, there’s no doubt, particularly in designing the scene where Sugar Ray Robinson, in the third bout that they have, when La Motta’s on the ropes, looks up at him, and Sugar Ray comes in for the kill. And there’s a kind of edited sequence of punishment that this character’s taking. I based it on, shot by shot, the shower scene of Psycho. And so I designed it correspondingly, in a way. The glove corresponds to a knife. And so, we shot it that way.


Martin Scorsese :  In Raging Bull, I guess the boxing scenes have a lot to do with the action sequences in my mind. All this editing and all this camera movement that I’d been exposed to for the past 25 years or 30 years came into play in those sequences, and Hitchcock had a lot to do with it, there’s no doubt, particularly in designing the scene where Sugar Ray Robinson, in the third bout that they have, when La Motta’s on the ropes, looks up at him, and Sugar Ray comes in for the kill. And there’s a kind of edited sequence of punishment that this character’s taking. I based it on, shot by shot, the shower scene of Psycho. And so I designed it correspondingly, in a way. The glove corresponds to a knife. And so, we shot it that way.


Martin Scorsese :  In Raging Bull, I guess the boxing scenes have a lot to do with the action sequences in my mind. All this editing and all this camera movement that I’d been exposed to for the past 25 years or 30 years came into play in those sequences, and Hitchcock had a lot to do with it, there’s no doubt, particularly in designing the scene where Sugar Ray Robinson, in the third bout that they have, when La Motta’s on the ropes, looks up at him, and Sugar Ray comes in for the kill. And there’s a kind of edited sequence of punishment that this character’s taking. I based it on, shot by shot, the shower scene of Psycho. And so I designed it correspondingly, in a way. The glove corresponds to a knife. And so, we shot it that way.


Martin Scorsese :  In Raging Bull, I guess the boxing scenes have a lot to do with the action sequences in my mind. All this editing and all this camera movement that I’d been exposed to for the past 25 years or 30 years came into play in those sequences, and Hitchcock had a lot to do with it, there’s no doubt, particularly in designing the scene where Sugar Ray Robinson, in the third bout that they have, when La Motta’s on the ropes, looks up at him, and Sugar Ray comes in for the kill. And there’s a kind of edited sequence of punishment that this character’s taking. I based it on, shot by shot, the shower scene of Psycho. And so I designed it correspondingly, in a way. The glove corresponds to a knife. And so, we shot it that way.


Martin Scorsese :  In Raging Bull, I guess the boxing scenes have a lot to do with the action sequences in my mind. All this editing and all this camera movement that I’d been exposed to for the past 25 years or 30 years came into play in those sequences, and Hitchcock had a lot to do with it, there’s no doubt, particularly in designing the scene where Sugar Ray Robinson, in the third bout that they have, when La Motta’s on the ropes, looks up at him, and Sugar Ray comes in for the kill. And there’s a kind of edited sequence of punishment that this character’s taking. I based it on, shot by shot, the shower scene of Psycho. And so I designed it correspondingly, in a way. The glove corresponds to a knife. And so, we shot it that way.


Martin Scorsese :  In Raging Bull, I guess the boxing scenes have a lot to do with the action sequences in my mind. All this editing and all this camera movement that I’d been exposed to for the past 25 years or 30 years came into play in those sequences, and Hitchcock had a lot to do with it, there’s no doubt, particularly in designing the scene where Sugar Ray Robinson, in the third bout that they have, when La Motta’s on the ropes, looks up at him, and Sugar Ray comes in for the kill. And there’s a kind of edited sequence of punishment that this character’s taking. I based it on, shot by shot, the shower scene of Psycho. And so I designed it correspondingly, in a way. The glove corresponds to a knife. And so, we shot it that way.
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Psycho (1960) - Psycho III (1986)
Psycho (1960) - Psycho III (1986)
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The shower scene has over 90 splices in it, and did not involve Anthony Perkins at all. Contrary to popular belief it wasn’t due to a scheduling conflict Perkins had for the Broadway musical ‘Greenville’ but actually a deliberate decision on Alfred Hitchcock’s part. On this subject Perkins states “Hitchcock was very worried that the dual role and nature of Norman Bates would be exposed if I were to appear in that scene. I think it was the recognizability of my silhouette, which is rather slim and broad in the shoulder that worried him.”
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iwdrm:

“She might have fooled me, but she didn’t fool my mother.”
Psycho (1960)
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fuckyeahmovieposters:

Psycho
Made and submitted by Matt Owen
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eccentricoddities:

Alfred Hitchcock and Anthony Perkins on the set of Psycho (1960).
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PSYCHO (1960) | Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
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cinemanimation:

Pyscho - Hitchock